Commentary

Online TV Viewing For Catch-Up

According to Nielsen's online panel data of U.S. visitors to online TV sites in the last 30 days, when it comes to viewing behavior, demographics, and ad effectiveness, those watching online TV Network video are closer demographically to DVR users by gender breaks, but closer to the general online population relative to age, reports Jon Gibs, VP for Insights, Online and Cross Media.

Americans are consuming more and more video on TV, Web and Mobile according to the recent Nielsen A2/M2 Three Screen Report, but the broader usage patterns suggest that online video is a replacement of DVR use, or used by those who do not have immediate access to TV. TV network content online is used to catch up with programming, and not typically as a replacement for TV viewing, as results from the email survey showed.

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Reasons For Watching TV Shows On The Internet

Reason

% of Respondents

Forgot to watch a specific episode when it aired on TV

54%

Catching up on the current season of programming because I missed a large number of episodes

47%

Catching up on a past season of a program before the next season airs

33%

Forgot to record a specific episode with my DVR or TiVo when it aired on TV

32%

Other member of my household watching another program at the same time

18%

Watch TV programming online when I am at work

12%

Watch TV programming online when I travel

12%

Source: The Nielsen Company

Online TV Network consumption appears to be an activity set aside in specific sessions from most other online activities, says the report. For those who go online to watch TV shows, that activity dominates that particular online session, with women and the 18-34 group spending the biggest parts of their sessions on network viewing:.

Time Watching Video On Broadcast Site When Session Involves Broadcast Site Viewing

Viewers

% Session Time Watching

Average of all

73%

Men

75%

Women

69%

Age Groups

 

   2-11

50%

   12-17

71%

   18-24

78%

   25-34

79%

   35-49

69%

   50-64

68%

   65+

59%

Source: The Nielsen Company

While many of us may watch TV with friends or family members, the viewing of TV shows online proves to be a rather solitary activity. This may change as internet connectivity to our main TV screens becomes more ubiquitous, but right now, the majority of online viewers prefer to be alone.

Frequency of Watching TV on the Internet With One or More Other People

Frequency

% of Respondents

Never

49%

Rarely

35

Often

7

Frequently

7

Always

3

Source: The Nielsen Company

TV commercial spots reused online appear to have more impact on recall and likeability than creative just designed for online, as noted in a case study with food and beverage ads.

Recall In F & B Category on Premium Video Sites (% of Respondents)

Ad Type

General Recall

Brand Recall

Message Recall

Likeability

Repurposed TV ad

55%

46%

31%

24%

Web original ad

47

40

21

23

Web original flash animation

34

31

19

14

Source: The Nielsen Company

The writer concludes that "This look into the similarities and differences of TV viewing on the web should be a reminder to brand managers that 'context' is just as much king these days as content."

And, to put Online viewing in perspective, another recent Nielsen report finds that the number of unique viewers of online video increased 5.2% year-over-year from 137.4 million unique viewers in January 2009 to 142.7 million in January 2010.

Overall Online Video Usage (U.S.)

 

January 2010

Year-Over-Year

Month-Over-Month

Unique Viewers (000)

142,668

5.2%

3.8%

Total Streams (000)

11,061,458

5.8%

3.1%

Streams per Viewer

77.5

0.5%

-0.8%

Time per Viewer (min)

188.7

5.7%

-2.3%

Source: The Nielsen Company

 

Top U.S. Online Brands Ranked by Total Streams (January 2010)

Rank

Video Brand

Total Streams (000)

M-O-M Streams % Growth

1

YouTube

6,622,374

3.0%

2

Hulu

635,546

0.1%

3

Yahoo!

221,355

-9.2%

4

MSN/WindowsLive/Bing

179,741

27.3%

5

Turner Sports and Entertainment Digital Network

137,311

-3.5%

6

MTV Networks Music

131,077

31.7%

7

ABC Television

128,510

71.3%

8

Fox Interactive Media

124,513

-0.7%

9

Nickelodeon Kids and Family Network

117,057

9.3%

10

Megavideo

115,089

3.7%

Source: The Nielsen Company

Among the top Web brands ranked by unique viewers in January, Disney Online was the fastest growing month-over-month, increasing 23.3%. Facebook and MSN/WindowsLive/Bing were the second and third fastest growing, increasing 18.6% and 15.6% month-over-month, respectively.

Top U.S. Online Brands Ranked by Unique Viewers (January 2010)

Rank

Video Brand

Unique Viewers (000)

M-O-M Viewers % Growth

1

YouTube

112,642

6.7%

2

Yahoo!

26,081

-5.3%

3

Facebook

21,529

18.6%

4

MSN/WindowsLive/Bing

15,645

15.6%

5

Hulu

15,256

11.9%

6

Fox Interactive Media

11,450

4.9%

7

Google

10,567

2.5%

8

CNN Digital Network

10,385

11.6%

9

ESPN Digital Network

8,995

6.2%

10

Disney Online

8,066

23.3%

Source: The Nielsen Company

For additional information from Nielsen and this study, please visit here.

 

 

 

 

3 comments about "Online TV Viewing For Catch-Up".
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  1. Liz Rice from Liz Rice Consulting, February 25, 2010 at 8:47 a.m.

    If anyone is interested in the UK online TV market and would like data on relative share of BBC iPlayer, ITV player, 4oD, Demand Five, at least as far as Tank Top TV viewers are concerned, please don't hesitate to get in touch with us at http://www.tanktop.tv.

  2. Sheila Seles, February 25, 2010 at 11:17 a.m.

    I hope this data encourages TV networks to make more episodes available and put shows online as close to air time as possible. Right now people can usually only catch up with the last five episodes of a series on Hulu. This report indicates that people would want to see more than five episodes. Networks could monetize that content better if more if it were available online. Check out this free white paper on the subject of online TV viewers: http://bit.ly/aFzfoy

  3. Pabla Blaco from pulpo media, February 25, 2010 at 3:42 p.m.

    Who writes these articles? The first paragraph is the longest sentence in the history of bad writing!

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