Mattel Creates IoT System To Help Parents Teach Children

Mattel aims to bring a fully connected and AI-driven ecosystem to parenting with new products launched at CES.

The Aristotle ecosystem centers around a connected, AI-driven WiFi and Bluetooth speaker, which visually appears similar to Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home and a small WiFi camera.

However, the software and services behind the device are specifically designed to aid in nurturing and educating children from the early stages to adolescence, according to Mattel.

“Raising kids can be hectic and we saw a need for an IoT system that simplifies the complex and dynamic lives of families, while providing them with peace of mind,” Jim Mitchell, VP and GM of Nabi, said.

“Our goal with the launch of Aristotle is to provide parents with a platform that simplifies parenting, while helping them nurture, teach and protect their young ones.”

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Parent and Child modes alter the user experience and capabilities of the device and are customizable. For example, Mattel said in Child mode, ecommerce capabilities could be disabled and engagement with the assistant could require the word "please" to complete a request.

The device, which is voice-controlled, leverages cognitive services from Microsoft and Silk Labs and learns and evolves over time as the child’s needs change. Mattel also plans to add Microsoft’s Cortana Intelligence capabilities in the future.

As a result, it can autonomously address needs of the child and parents such as soothing crying, find online deals and purchase products, teach foreign languages and reinforce good manners, according to Mattel.

For example, if the system’s camera detects the baby moving or the microphone detects crying, it can automatically play a lullaby and turn on dimmed lights.

Aristotle also supports IFTTT (If This Then That) so parents can set up similar reactive events with other connected products in the home.

Connected products from Samsung’s SmartThings platform, Philips Lighting, Wemo and Wink can be integrated with Aristotle and Mattel plans to launch additional products for the ecosystem, starting with a baby monitor.

Security and privacy are also built into the ecosystem, and Mattel says it focused on complying with COPPA and HIPAA protocols for its use of data.

 

5 comments about "Mattel Creates IoT System To Help Parents Teach Children".
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  1. R MARK REASBECK from www.USAonly.US , January 9, 2017 at 11:40 a.m.

    Raising kids can be hectic and we saw a need for an IoT system that simplifies the complex and dynamic lives of families, while providing them with peace of mind,” Jim Mitchell, VP and GM of Nabi, said.

    “Our goal with the launch of Aristotle is to provide parents with a platform that simplifies parenting, while helping them nurture, teach and protect their young ones.”


    What a load of Crap.  How about put the gadgets down, and spend some one-on-one time  with your kid, and here's an idea, HAVE DIALOGUE, not lol's on a smartphone screen which is creating the "dynamic and hectic lives"

  2. Doug Garnett from Protonik, LLC replied, January 9, 2017 at 5:19 p.m.

    Couldn't agree more, Mark. Even more, from what I read here the only real feature I see is that it's like a parental controled Alexa. Child protected devices have been tried for every technological advance in the history of man...and failed to get good market traction. (I believe if we go back far enough there was a parental controls option for the wheel - a square shape - to keep kids from being injured.)

  3. Doug Garnett from Protonik, LLC, January 10, 2017 at 5:49 p.m.

    One last comment... The reason all these "family friendly" products fail is that...they're NOT Alexa (or whichever product they're trying to be). What people want is Alexa (et. al.) with those controls. And this is probably, also, why family friendly/helpful electronics are used a bit less than you'd expect. Because usually they turn a great thing into something less than great.  

    After all, sticking with my absurd analogy, what cavemen wanted was a wheel that wouldn't hurt their kids - not a non-wheel with a pretty name. 

  4. R MARK REASBECK from www.USAonly.US , January 10, 2017 at 8:29 p.m.

    Don't remember  as a teen ever having a problem getting booze, cigarettes, and condoms, and most of that was illegal. Kids are , shall we say, "Resourceful"

  5. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited, January 11, 2017 at 9:07 p.m.

    Cavemen had the wheel ?

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