beauty

Pour Moi Expands Beyond D2C, Steps Out On Amazon

Pour Moi, the D2C skincare brand based on regional climates, says it is joining the many indie beauty products making their way to Amazon.

Founder Ulli Haslacher says the products are rolling out on Amazon over the next few weeks, and that the company is working with Stella Rising, the marketing agency, as it aims to expand its reach.

The company, based in Upland, Calif., launched in 2017, with what it says is a skincare first. Pour Moi targets a line of products — day and night creams, balancer and serums — to where women live. Recommendations are adjusted seasonally, too, to make sure women get the right level of environmental protection for their region.

“But it’s a concept some people don’t get right away,” Haslacher tells Marketing Daily. “People are skeptical of beauty products, which have a reputation for playing marketing games. But once they try us, they appreciate the idea, and our reorder rates are very high. And Amazon cannot be ignored.”

Amazon is well aware that beauty and personal care products are a hot category -- already Amazon’s second-most-shopped category, according to Pymnts.com, citing One Click Retail. The ecommerce giant sold $1.9 billion worth of health and personal care items in the second quarter of last year, up 23%, and $950 million in beauty products, a 26% jump.

Amazon is also rolling out its own beauty lines, including the new Fast Beauty Company, with all products under $15, and Find, low-cost cosmetics now available in the U.K.

Haslacher says Pour Moi, in the midst of getting patents in countries around the world, is fortunate in finding such a distinct niche. “The word 'climate’ hasn’t been mentioned in any skincare product patent we’ve been able to find, so we realize we’ve found a wide-open space in a tightly crowded category.”

She says she hopes the brand, already sold on Canadian shopping channels, will be sold on U.S. shopping networks in 2020, but that it is unlikely to look for distribution from conventional retailers.

“I worry about the inventory, because the products need to be stored in temperature-controlled warehouses,” she says.

This year, the company is focused on expanding the product assortment, adding masques and cleansers.

She says the company remains committed to its no-sampling policy and instead offers a robust 30-day satisfaction guarantee. “Our consumers have told us that if we’re going to be a climate-smart product, then we have to be serious about climate change -- so we’re staying away from single-use plastic,” Haslacher says. “Our customers are right about this. We should be more proactive.”

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