Results for September 2010
  • Too Much,Too Soon?
    At their most simple, the photographs from JeongMee Yoon's series "The Pink & Blue Project" portray children as residents of two distinct environments: Girls live in pink rooms; boys live in blue rooms. But both genders exhibit an increasingly prevalent commonality among today's youth: the sheer amount of things they own.
  • Born Again
    After two years of double-digit ad page declines and flat (at best) CAGRs as far into the future as the spreadsheet can see, the magazine industry could use a savior right about now. And that precisely is how some in the industry treated Steve Jobs' gift from Mount Cupertino -- a new tablet format that sold over 3 million units in the spring alone.
  • Wireless Imagination*
    Superconsumers will have hit their prime by 2020; indeed, they'll control the bulk of purchasing power in this country. What kind of world will they live in?
  • Television: An Obit
    Television is survived by VOD, streaming video and video-sharing services.
  • The Prosumer Revolution
    Aiding the professional video educational effort is Dirck Halstead, a photojournalist who covered the White House for 29 years for Time magazine and whose photographs have appeared on 47 Time covers.
  • Pro Tools
    A new generation of hybrid still-video cameras will soon bring amazing, low-cost image-making tools to the masses on a level undreamed of even a decade ago. Before the revolution is finished, still photography and full-motion video will merge, creating a new category of imaging for the multimedia age.
  • Letter from the Guest Editor
    If you haven't changed every aspect of how you work by now, I'm sorry, but you're fucked. Because they're here. Already. They're defining how we shop, what we eat, how we communicate, and for me, how we design customer experiences.
  • Exit Interview: David Skokna
    We weren't quite prepared for someone like David Skokna, the founder and creative chief at Huge, who is not a professional editor, but took the assignment as seriously, and in the process, challenged the in-house MEDIA team on ideas, executions, and well, our own editorial judgment.
  • The Future of Talent
    The generation of talent coming to the workforce today faces more than the counter-culture tumult of the '60s, more than the acid-flashback hangover of the '70s, more than the heady and chemical-powered conspicuous consumption caravan of the '80s, and more than the ennui of the '90s.
  • The Right Problem
    The story of Napster gives modern media executives an interesting roadmap for successfully building communities and tapping into the user-generated involvement that can open up new growth and revenue opportunities if they understand one simple idea: User-generated content isn't the problem. It's the solution to the problem the traditional media didn't know it had.
« Previous Entries