• Programmatic TV: More 'In Their Own Words'
    Last week investigative journalist Charlene Weisler and I allowed some of the prominent programmatic TV players to speak for themselves rather than through our vivisection of their value proposition. We started with data-ists Rentrak and Oracle Data Management Platform. This week we'll continue with platforms TubeMogul and Videa.
  • Programmatic TV: In Their Own Words
    Charlene Weisler and I thought it would be an interesting proposition for this week's Audience Buying Insider to allow some of the prominent programmatic TV players to speak for themselves rather than through our vivisection of their value propositions.
  • In Defense Of Swapping: TV Programmatic Inventory
    One of the impediments to the acceptance of TV programmatic platforms by the ensconced TV buying community is the concern over whether there will ever be sufficient "quality" inventory -- a.k.a. broadcast and cable network programs in traditionally valued dayparts -- available for the wonders of a transparency-automated, workflow-efficiencied, and third- and first-partied, mixologized-data platform that propels the TV planning and purchasing process into the digital epoch. There's precedent, with myriad examples of broadcasters and cablers swapping their most valued video inventory with outside sales entities for cash or the promise thereof. From the beginning:
  • The DMA To DMZ: An Impression
    If memory serves me well, back in the mid-1950s two opposing media research forces were vying for hegemony over the naming and defining rights for a "media market," a static, physical piece of property that was defined by many characteristics, such as number of people, homes, education, families, dwelling, income, boundaries, occupation, that would stretch continuously in many shapes and sizes across the United States. The two top contenders were ADI (area of dominant influence) and DMA (designated marketing area). My understanding is that somehow Nielsen Media Research won the coin toss, and DMA it has been ever since.
  • It's All TV, Isn't It: A Rumination
    I'm a TV guy, and proud of it. I enjoy horizontally watching a slew of my favorite professionally produced TV programs, surfing the electronic program guide, and neurotically scanning my personal video recordings selections to ascertain future storage capacity. I eagerly await the ubiquitous deployment of advanced TV applications in the televisual realm: addressability (with interactive extensions), telescoping, intuitive navigation (encompassing all content, all the time, on-demand) and TV programmatic pragmatism coupled with more meaningful, manageable "big data." That's me. So here is my question to you: Why the continued TV and digital video divide, though agencies religiously profess the …