Results for November 2008
  • Digital Lessons TV Should Learn From Music Companies: Watch The Rising Waters
    Traditional big media will only really become new media when there is a digital revenue tipping point -- so one theory might go. One music company, Atlantic Records, seems to have hit that mark, now getting more revenues from digital platforms than its traditional businesses. How far behind are TV companies?
  • Weak TV Ad Market? What About Prime-time Infomercials?
    Now that Fox has officially abandoned kids' programming after dropping its time-buy agreement with TV producer 4Kids Entertainment, its next step seems less about programming than about plugging a financial hole. Fox is going with all advertising on Saturday mornings, becoming the first broadcast network to regularly schedule infomercials.
  • Traditional TV-Minded Companies Want Consumers To Themselves -- Even For A Minute
    Wandering in the Burbank Airport, I'm again reminded how the whole media business goes in two simple, straight-line directions: up and down.
  • Kids' Obesity Problems Go Beyond Television
    Cut back on a diet of fast-food commercials for kids, and you'll be cutting back on their weight. How about cutting back on their parents' influence as well?
  • Video Streaming: Solution To Conference Slowdowns?
    Executives at TV and media conferences everywhere fear the economy will slow down their attendance and revenues -- especially during the next six months, when the recession will take its biggest bite. Analysts are already saying events like NATPE, TVB, NAB, NCTA, RTNDA and the AAAA Media Conference could be in trouble this spring. My suggestion: Ramp up marketing efforts for future conferences by offering more free live and previously recorded streaming video of seminars and sessions.
  • Recession's Upside: Better Ratings From Unhappier Viewers
    TV executives should love unhappy TV viewers. In a weakening economy, with advertising dollars slipping away, more TV viewers with sad faces could be the silver lining.
  • Hulu Good For Traditional TV Advertisers; YouTube, Not So Much
    NBC's lowly fourth-place position among TV networks is in direct counterpoint to its growing Internet video position. Glowing press reviews of NBC Universal and News Corp's joint-venture Internet video Web site, Hulu.com, now promise even better news. With some $70 million in total revenues -- virtually all advertising revenues -- Hulu's numbers are getting close to, dare we say, YouTube.
  • TV's New Metrics -- Ben Silverman Knows The Score
    Is a network that is down 13% in ratings but up 50% in profitability a success? From just these metrics you might say, at this specific moment, yes. These numbers are attached to NBC network, and in particular a reflection on Ben Silverman , co-chairman of NBC Entertainment and Universal Media Studios.
  • The Not-So-Secret Of Success for Internet Shows: Advertise On TV
    It takes more than a little word-of-mouth buzz to be a successful original Internet show. Better use one of marketing's most effective tools: TV.
  • Happy TV Dreaming: Consumers Think Everyone Will Get HDTV
    Television terms such as HDTV, digital TV, and VOD can be confusing -- especially to the average Joe. Now matter how hard your Best Buy salesperson explains things, not everyone may have a full understanding of the new television tech language.
« Previous Entries