• Will Moms Buy Groceries Online?
    In late 2015, Oreo cookies ran a successful promotion tied to the holidays called "Oreo Colorfilled." The brand cleverly engaged consumers online by allowing them to personalize special holiday-themed packages of Oreos to send to friends. The entire experience took place online from personalization of the cookie packages all the way to credit card capture and check out.
  • Dear Doctor: How To Market To Moms
    I recently completed a four-article series on marketing to moms for "Bentson Clark reSource," a quarterly publication dedicated entirely to orthodontic practices. Why orthodontists, you may ask? This particular healthcare category is all about moms and their children, of course.
  • Want To Sell Products To Parents? Stop Ignoring Dad
    On this year's Super Bowl broadcast, Audi became the latest brand to depict a new kind of father in its advertising, one who is sensitive, thoughtful, and deeply committed to the well-being of his children. In the 60-second commercial, a dad watches his daughter compete in a go-cart race while expressing the hope that she will one day be treated as an equal to her male peers. After years of commercials dominated by bumbling men, ads like Audi's are not only a breath of fresh air for the audience but also a business necessity for the brands that produce them.
  • Tapping The Passion Of Food Allergy Moms: Seizing A Brand Opportunity
    Think food allergies only affect the 15 million Americans (including 6 million children) who are actually allergic? Think again. Food allergies drive life-changing decisions for entire families, sometimes whole communities: from schools to offices to playgroups. Moreover, some experts believe that the circle of Americans touched by food allergy concerns greatly exceeds15 million.
  • The Erosion Of Trust And What It Means For Brands
    There is no escaping the term "fake news" these days. All you have to do is scroll through your news feed and the term appears on a regular basis. This, coupled with some of the scandals that have been plaguing corporations recently such as Volkswagen faking emissions tests and the makers of the EpiPen increasing its cost by 400%, has had an impact on consumer trust. And it isn't a positive one.
  • 5 Ways Mom Consumer Communities Help Grow Your Bottom Line
    There was once a time when most of us were listening to music on cassette tapes, when brands interacted with consumers only in focus group facilities and information was gathered via phone surveys. Today, the options to engage with customers are boundless. Technology's rapid growth birthed a new wave of advancement. Everything from our dog's collar to our refrigerator is "smart" and while technology continues to advance, it begs the question, "Are brands any smarter in the way they are growing their bottom line?" The truth might hurt some.
  • Moms Divided: What The Women's Marches Can Highlight for Brands
    By many accounts, the Women's Marches held last Saturday in Washington, D.C., and around the country were a success. It is estimated that well over 1 million people participated in the marches in the U.S. alone. There were, of course, "sister marches" in many cities around the world.
  • 4 Marketing-to-Moms Tactics For 2017
    There has been a lot of debate around the death of the mom blogger. Regardless of which side of the fence you fall on in the argument, the good news is that mom bloggers have given birth to social media influencers with greater reach and more channels to deliver your message.
  • Chatbots Are Revolutionizing The Way You Re-engage Moms
    Chatbots powered by artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and machine learning are 2016's gift to marketers looking to enhance customer experience in a personalized and relevant way.
  • Millennial Moms (And Dads) Bringing Back The Art Of Couponing
    Over the last 40 years, it was not uncommon to see moms (and increasingly dads) huddled around kitchen tables, scissors in hand, clipping out all those little squares of savings known as coupons. From penny savers to local newspapers, budget-minded families made coupons a part of every shopping trip. It seems that Millennials learned a lot from their parents as they are now keeping couponing alive, but in a much more tech-savvy way.
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