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Dave Morgan

Member since March 2008Contact Dave

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  • Has OTT Advertising's Time Arrived? by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/20/2018)

    Spot on Tom. Lots of opportunities out there in TV's transition to OTT to solve, from fragmentataion to user-acceptable ad loads to automated buying and selling with balanced yield managemed (for both sellers and buyers). It will be fun to watch!

  • Has OTT Advertising's Time Arrived? by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/20/2018)

    Nicely said Bob!

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    Excellent points Long. To create a win/win, I think that it is critical for TV to attract the native digital advertisers, first with CPM’s that are competitive, then with performance and ROI and then, as they mature, with great adjaceny and branding. TV can’t start with the last first. It hasn’t worked very well, and the TV media owners don’t have years to wait them out.

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    I’m totally with you on this Ed. Changing from corporate to product/brand buying would be game-changing.

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    Darrin, thanks. You are correct. I wasn't suggesting that there aren't lots of sub .5's that can - and are - sold on their demo's and for their content/day-part/network uniqueness. That is the core thesis. The point I was trying to make - but not very artfully - is that the vast majority of those spots are not transacted that way, and that it is a big opportunity for the industry.

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    Ed, I get your point and it is a fair one, but there is not much question that TV buyers today handle spots with ratings below 0.5 as bulk inventory. Those spots are bought as packaging, ADU's or DR. Very, very few are actually bought by name or on any data beyond broad sex/age demographics since the standard error rate for a Nielsen rating of a 0.2 or 0.3 show is over 100. For all real purposes, the spots are "below the surface" when it comes to the TV ad buying process. The thesis of my column is that the industry better start using data, automation and optimization to start uncovering these spots - finding the needles in the haystack and aggregatig them by the ton.

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    Ed, thanks for the strong but, but on the 80% number, please consult Nielsen AMRLD and you will find that the 80% is true. Sub 0.5 spots haven’t accounted for less than 5% of national TV ad impressions since Barry Fischer’s Media at the Millenium work (the change of The Millenia).

  • TV Has A Melting Iceberg Problem by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 09/13/2018)

    Very true Jack. This is a problem tailor-made for automated, data driven buying platforms, which is why I think that over the next 3-4 years we’ll see more digital tech enhance linear TV advertising than replacing it

  • Are National TV Ads Actually Too Cheap? by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 08/23/2018)

    Craig, I do think that we will see more automated trading on TV soon for sure, but human tradking still represents 99+% of all TV ad transactions, so I wouldn't worry too much about human trading disappearing anytime soon. I suspect that, at best, automated trading will represent 50% of TV trqnsactoins in 5 years.

  • Are National TV Ads Actually Too Cheap? by Dave Morgan (Media Insider on 08/23/2018)

    Jerome, "all ad impressions" on TV are premium video (certainly by the digital definition), so comparing TV to premium digital video is certainly the closest to an apples-to-apples comparison, even though the average viewable digital video ad is 6-10 seconds while on TV 30 second is the norm, with 15 seonds and 60 second ad quie common as wel. Comparing TV to digitial banners make no sense, since most web pages display at least six banners at once and TV only plays one ad at a time - no comparison of the relative share of voice delivered.

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