Commentary

Disrupt -- Or Please Get Out Of The Way

I recently had a dialogue where I argued that I don't believe in stupid people, and that's why I dream of being a part of the education cycle one day, potentially a teacher.

I think that most people are (unfortunately) relatively average -- which creates amazing opportunities for others By that I mean that most people don't usually work 15 hours a day, do not fantasize about having masters in mathematics, do not want to give up their social life that easily, and do not honestly believe that they should be huge one day.

Most people's biggest obstacle, funnily enough, is, well -- themselves.

You might agree, or not. If you think there is something to it, you would understand most people are relatively mediocre just because they decide to and not because they have to be. This means that there is a real opportunity to do more, do better, to become an entrepreneur, to disrupt.

I don't think people need to actually have perfect SAT score to succeed, or an MBA, or to come from money, or to know 3 languages. People need passion, to be really excited about at least one single thing, to be able to dedicate years of their life to something that keeps them up at night, something that can make them cry, something that can get them to wake up at 6 a.m. and come back home at 11 p.m.

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Seek that, and you'll create an unfair personal advantage. You'll be at least like a politician who has mastered talking a little bit on all topics to look like they are really intelligent. You'll have that look like there is something bigger to be done, and you'll get the attention of investors, potential employees, partners, marketers.

As an example, I don't think employers are looking for template people, and I feel sorry for those who do. I think employers are looking for that spark, that thing that gets them to think -- I just want to work with that person, I'm not sure what they will do here but they will do one thing really well, and they'll get folks around them to do exactly the same.

If any of this makes sense, you might realize that the biggest reason you might not be where you can be (and you can!) is you. That's why it's amazing to take risks, make mistakes, live in uncertainty for a while and be inspired. I'll tell you what I said to all the people I ever hired: they could always go back to work for "a Google" as they are really smart, and that's why if you can take risks and potentially be a part of something big -- you should.

Disrupt. Most people around you will not, I promise you.

Eventually, most of us are likely to fail. Statistically it's true. But you'll have a great experience, and you'll learn a lot. I think.

Most of us are mediocre. This is great news for you. Disrupt, or please get out of the way.

3 comments about "Disrupt -- Or Please Get Out Of The Way ".
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  1. Mike Mcgrath from RealXstream PTY LTD, September 2, 2011 at 8:54 p.m.

    Ha! Fun article but very true non the less.

    In 1998 a personal friend, mentor and member of the Australian skydiving team taught me that if you love what you are doing then you will always be better than anyone else. This he said was because no matter how much talent, qualification or money another person has, they will quit before you will if the fundamentally are not enjoying it as much.
    I went on to become 3 times Australian champion in skydiving myself and start an international business for sharing skydiving videos.
    Needless to say that I have shared this advice with many athletes and business people since 1997, however for those who have not found what they love I have this to add:
    Doing what you love is the easy part. Finding what you love is the challenge...

  2. Michael Parker from Symantec, September 3, 2011 at 2:37 p.m.

    Beautifully said. Unfortunately true. Disrupt = innovate to me. Most would rather sit on the couch. It's an great opportunity to be in the game every day. Trying to make a difference.

  3. Adam Singolda from Taboola, September 3, 2011 at 7:34 p.m.

    Thanks all for the comments..Appreciated.

    You may like this post as well. It's a follow write-up by Om Malik, Founder at GigaOm, on something I wrote here on MediaPost few months ago. Mainly this post discusses the concept of patience, iteration, and dedication with little resources. High risk, and high reward.

    http://gigaom.com/2011/05/31/economics-of-good-enough/

    Adam

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