• ONLINE SPIN
    The Turing Test And The Uniqueness Of Humans
    There are only three things to write about this week, because, obviously, there are only three things happening in the world. Tony Stark Elon Musk gave away Tesla's technology to the world (announced via the awesomely titled blog post, "All Our Patent Are Belong To You"). Some people are playing soccer in Brazil. And a computer program has apparently passed the Turing Test.
  • ONLINE SPIN
    Your Ad Is Now Viewable, And Your Hamburger Is Now Edible
    If I may put a request out to all my colleagues in the advertising technology business: Please, please, please don't make a big deal out of telling people that their "ads are now viewable." We can do better than this. Because, seriously, "your ad is now viewable" doesn't sound any different than a hamburger meat company saying, "Now with real beef!" If you heard that, then you'd be thinking, well, what the heck was I eating before?
  • ONLINE SPIN
    Why Is Marketing Tech Like Listening To Miles Davis, Metallica And Phish?
    The answer: complexity. This is both a blessing and a curse. Marketing has become complex because of technology, data and the fragmentation of media. Creative has become more complex because messaging must break through the clutter of media fragmentation coupled with consumer multitasking and the sheer volume of inter-related activities a consumer undertakes. Dealing with complexity can be anxiety-producing, to say the least. What's to keep a marketer sane?
  • ONLINE SPIN
    The Long Game
    We live in a world of short-term results. The purgatory of quarterly earnings, as important as they are, dictate the prioritization, execution and measurement of pretty much all marketing efforts. There is light at the end of the tunnel, however. And we find it in the most surprising of places: a tweet. A series of tweets from @DrFNFurter of "Rocky Horror Picture Show" fame.
  • ONLINE SPIN
    Marketing Capability Development: Most Companies Spend Lots, Measure Zero
    Over the last few months I have collaborated with the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) on research about building marketing capabilities within companies. The reality is that, especially during the economic crisis of 2008/2009, the investment in the development of employees' people skills and marketing capabilities has taken a serious nose-dive. According to U.S. data from Deloitte, spending in capability development went down by 11% in each of those two years, for a decrease of 22% in total. Spend in capability development is now growing again, but that seems to be just making up for lost time. The biggest shock ...
  • ONLINE SPIN
    The Best People In The World To Sell To, And The Best Thing To Sell To Them
    Hey, there! What are you up to this weekend? Want to come help me move? No? Of course you don't. Nobody likes to move. We do it because we're forced to, because it's less expensive than throwing everything out and buying all new stuff, because we've somehow grown attached to our possessions.
  • ONLINE SPIN
    The Power Of Words
    The Internet is a powerful medium, but not as powerful as the spoken word. For proof, simply look at the news and read the headlines. Words can hurt. Words can heal. Words can solve problems -- and words can create more problems than you could ever imagine.
  • ONLINE SPIN
    And On The 45th Day, They Tweeted
    When people ask me about my professional background, I often quip that I'm a "recovering ad guy." After reading Business Insider's "The 45-Day Planning Process That Goes Into Creating A Single Corporate Tweet," I'm reminded this is exactly what I'm still recovering from. Too many hours of my stint at a "traditional agency" were spent obsessing over a single piece of content. All those billable hours, creative energy, and expense for a piece of content that was increasingly being ignored and skipped via the traditional medium that delivered them. Yup, it was this special breed of insanity that had me ...
  • ONLINE SPIN
    The Five Stages Of Grief: How Marketers Deal With New Digital Ecosystem
    Most people are familiar with the five stages of grief, as pioneered by Swiss-American psychiatrist Elisabeth Kbler-Ross in her 1969 book "On Death and Dying." The stages are, in order: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. For marketers dealing with the realities of digital advertising, I am going to advocate a revision of this model, with the order now denial, depression, anger, bargaining and acceptance.
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