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Robert Passikoff

Member since September 2006Contact Robert

Robert can be reached at: robertp@brandkeys.com

Articles by Robert All articles by Robert

  • Reader 'Trust' Levels For Newspapers-Of-Choice Shows Modest Gains in Research Intelligencer on 05/07/2019

    In the second installment of our consumer research measuring "trust" among readers of their newspapers-of-choice there were slight improvements in the major rankings, but no dramatic shifts since our October 2018 benchmarks. The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post remain America's top three most-trusted newspapers and each improved their levels two percentage points.

  • Left Wins Midterms, Media Trust Too in Marketing Politics Weekly on 02/20/2019

    Trust in TV network news brands appears to be tracking overall political momentum. With few exceptions -- most notably gains by right-wing local news broadcaster Sinclair -- left-wing news networks experienced the greatest gains since August 2018. The biggest loser was Donald J. Trump.

  • Visual Search, Gen Z, Live Video: Trends For New Year in Marketing Insider on 12/19/2018

    Here's a look at what's coming down the pike to add new -- and profitable -- opportunities into your brand planning.

  • America's Most Trusted Newspaper Brands in Research Intelligencer on 09/11/2018

    "The New York Times" and "The Wall Street Journal" tied as No. 1 among 15 major daily newspapers analyzed as part of the Media Trust Tracker, a collaboration of Brand Keys and MediaPost's "Research Intelligencer," which measures how much a user's trust contributes to their engagement with the brand. Interestingly, the role of trust among the major daily newspapers was relatively high with a narrow margin of difference vs. an analysis we published in July of the major television news brands.

  • TV's Most Trusted News Brands in Research Intelligencer on 07/30/2018

    The BBC is the most trusted TV news brand, followed closely by Fox News and PBS, according to an analysis created for Research Intelligencer by Brand Keys. The analysis, which draws from the 2018 "Customer Loyalty and Engagement Index," examines 1,287 brands across 150 categories to determine how much "trust" contributed to each brand's engagement and market success.

  • The Rising Importance Of Brand Values in Marketing Insider on 07/12/2018

    Political polarization, voter tribalism and recent, fervent social movements like #grabyourwallet, #MeToo, and #TimesUp have changed the face of brand engagement and consumer loyalty in virtually every brand sector this year.

  • Rising Importance Of Brand Values in Marketing Politics Weekly on 07/11/2018

    Brand Keys has identified new consumer values that have combined to create unprecedented shifts that define how consumers view categories, compare brands and options within particular categories, and how they will buy, buy again, and remain loyal to a brand. The shift in values has resulted in brand leadership changes (and same-store sales and profitability figures) in 60% of the 84 B2C and B2B categories tracked, which includes 761 brands, evaluated by 50,527 U.S. consumers.

  • In What Do We Trust? in MediaDailyNews on 07/08/2018

    "Trust" has emerged as the universal truth and common denominator that modern consumers use to differentiate brands. "Trust," to one degree or another, is part of every category's consumer decision process. The question is, how much does "trust" contribute to audience engagement?

  • What's In A Name? in Marketing Daily on 02/24/2017

    Sometimes changing a name can be a powerful move and sometimes it's a risky proposition.

  • America's Favorite Beer in Marketing Daily on 06/10/2016

    Are you so desperate that you'd throw away billions already invested in the brand - even one at the bottom of the list - and confuse shoppers just to try to co-opt the value of 'patriotism'?

Comments by Robert All comments by Robert

  • The Rising Importance Of Brand Values by Robert Passikoff (Marketing Insider on 07/12/2018)

    Marketers will need to be able to accurately identify what values are most important to their consumers and determine how those values will be best expressed within the context of their particular category. These will have to come from the consumers’ own points-of-view, and not from marketer preconceptions or assumed definitions. As those consumer views have become more emotionally-driven over the past decade, the addition of tribal political and activist values have transformed the brand space into something marketers haven’t faced before. If marketers think they knew what values were important to consumers before, they are going to need to take a very hard look, very quickly at themselves and their brand, because as of now, it’s extraordinarily likely that consumers have an entirely new-view of what’s ideal for them.The new, value-based bottom line: Consumers are only going to buy from brands that can deliver the values they truly expect. A brand that fails to do that will find themselves facing a consumer backlash.

  • Super Bowl Advertising: ROI Friend Or Foe? by Ashley Deibert (Marketing: Sports on 02/01/2017)

    Consumers need to be emotionally engaged with the ads so they come away feeling the brand better meets the expectations they hold for the category Ideal. Puppies are cute and all, but the ultimate question is what did it do for the Budweiser brand? Beyond collecting all those shares, likes, and tweets. Which do correlate with “entertainment” but not so much with sales. Last year only13 of the 33 brands (or thirty-nine percent, down ten percent from the 13-year historical average of forty-nine percent) were assessed as both engaging and entertaining. Of those 13, only 6 were determined to be both highly engaging and highly entertaining. Look, we understand that agencies and marketers hope their ads will entertain. That’s a dimension that’s easy to measure. And unquestionably advertising entertainment and social networking reviews generate lots of chatter. So there you are. You managed to entertain 115 million viewers. But these days that’s not enough. Or shouldn’t be. With 30-second spots selling for $5 million plus, marketers need a new game plan when it comes to assessing advertising ROI. A laugh, a sigh, or a tweet alone isn’t really an acceptable return on budgets this big. Advertising should be judged not by entertainment ratings or social networking trend metrics, but how it ultimately helps the brand perform in the marketplace. Does the ad engage and build the brand’s equity? Does it drive brand share, consumer behavior, and sales? If so, you’ll score positive bottom line impact, even if the advertising wasn’t as entertaining as envisioned. But on this particular Sunday, when a brand gets into people’s living rooms or on their computers or mobile screens, it doesn’t

  • The Black Knight, The Black Swan & Trump Soul by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 05/05/2016)

    nobody should have been have been surprised at the outcome! Why do we say that? Well, we told you. Last year in fact. Shortly after he announced his candidacy. We told you that he was a more-than-viable Republican candidate for president and a serious contender.  How did we know?  We conducted an emotional engagement survey among likely Republican voters.Check out our most recent Linked In post to see what we said nearly a year ago!

  • Most Brands Aren't Getting What They Are Paying For In Super Bowl by Karl Greenberg (Marketing Daily on 01/23/2015)

    The only one of the 5 that's been validated to correlate with positive behavior in the marketplace and – axiomatically, sales and profits – has been emotional engagement, which is defined as moving the brand closer to the consumers' Ideal in the category where the brand competes. "Emotional" does not = "tearing up," which is actually imagery. But as the industry uses it without looking for any link to ROI. Engagement with the platform (CBS) or the program (Super Bowl) is fine. But it's not engagement with the brand.

  • A CPG Planner's Wish For 2015 by Paolo Pazzia (Marketing: CPG on 01/05/2015)

    Boy, do we agree with that. That said, I invite you to listen to this: http://brandkeys.com/what-happened/ If we can be of some help, let us know. Best of luck for the New Year, Robert Passikoff, Brand Keys, Inc.

  • Brunch At McDonald's? Maybe Later by Thom Forbes (Marketing Daily - Top of the News on 09/11/2014)

    Thom, Take a look at this and tell me whether Baby Boomers or Millennials rage going to storm anyone's fast food castle for brunch? With or without a "Mc." http://brandkeys.blogspot.com/

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