Results for May 2009
  • Wide Open Spaces
    From coding to agency models to online video, where there's a will, there's a wiki. Could the online video business be rewriting the playbook for the creation of open source options?
  • Corporate Re-brand: Growth Industry
    When Jan Valentic took over as senior vice president of global marketing and growth platforms at gardening giant Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. two years ago, one of her first moves was to challenge the company's biggest brands and how they marketed online.
  • RAM: Married to It
    Will broadband video shows eat broadcast's lunch? The game show "BFF" - which pits pairs of friends against one another to see which team knows each other better - is produced by former Miramar executive Meryl Poster, who has pilots stacked up at Bravo and NBC Universal. But this one's for MySpace. This isn't the only TV production company moving to the site. MySpace is also working with Endemol, creator of Fear Factor and Deal or No Deal on "Married on MySpace." In this reality show, couples compete for a lavish wedding, with MySpace users helping to plan it and ...
  • Cross-Media Case Study: To the Dogs
    You need only scan the daily headlines to know that General Motors, Chrysler and Ford are going to the dogs. So, it turns out, is their chief rival, Toyota - but in an entirely different way. As the recession grabbed hold of Americans, the Japanese auto juggernaut was feeling pressure from slowing sales. For the launch of the Venza, its new crossover sedan, it needed a way to wiggle into the wallets of active 40- to 60-year-old auto buyers worried about their dwindling iras.
  • Pearl Jam's Puzzling Play
    Online gaming and grunge. Who would have linked them back in the early 1990s? But they have come together, via pearljamtengame.com.
  • RAM: Play Dough
    Four years ago, the Grain Foods Foundation was created by milling and baking companies to counter the low-carb movement by providing information about the benefits of eating bread. Now, the foundation, which includes companies such as Sara Lee, is turning its attention to feeding the needy, even as it continues to promote bread through a multimedia campaign called the Bread Art Project.
  • Can Hyper-Distribution Learn to Hyper-Collect?
    "Hyper-distribution" was the catchword of 2008. Get your content out there, publishers were told, we'll monetize it later. It worked ... sort of. According to content tracking service Attributor, up to 5.3 times more people see a publisher's content away from its originating site. Thousands of blogs and aggregators simply reuse full copies of a publisher's articles on their own sites, and most of them are monetizing that content via three ad networks: DoubleClick, Google AdSense and Yahoo, Attributor also found.
  • RAM: License to Ill
    Tape decks have gone the way of the in-dash eight-track, but the enduring appeal of the carefully composed, old-school mixtape made Muxtape a huge Web hit early in 2008. Then the founder ran out of money to defend against licensing lawsuits.
  • RAM: For Your Consideration
    DVD screeners are so last year. This year Emmy voters will be able to watch at least one network's contenders in a new way - on the ever-popular iPhone. Showtime is launching an iPhone application in April for voting members of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to check out eligible shows like Weeds, Dexter and United States of Tara (which has a considerably smaller chance of taking home any gold statuettes than the former two, but it's on the app nonetheless) on their iPhone or iPod Touch.
  • RAM: A Free Press
    Who will be the YouTube of the bubbling eBook revolution? Online document-sharing service Scribd.com is making a case with 50 million users each month, coupled with recent deals with major publishing houses, including Random House and Simon & Schuster, to offer some of their books free of charge on the site. Sure, Google and Amazon have offered free books online for years, but Scribd stands out because it builds Web features into its service so other blogs and sites can embed books and documents, too.
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