• Facebook's New Face Has Wide-Ranging Effect
    Facebook just took giant steps toward expanding into a global technology company. The social network's decision to extend its technology platform to software developers should "create a raft of new opportunities for companies of all sizes," Kirkpatrick says, because it now allows anyone to build applications for social computing. In conjunction with the announcement, Facebook announced that 65 partner companies were unveiling more than 85 applications its members could install immediately. Sounding Google-like, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said "we want to make Facebook into something of an operating system, so you can run full applications" similar to how Microsoft's Windows ...
  • Cyberattacks In Estonia Worry Feds
    Cyberattacks are possibly even scarier than terrorist attacks, because so many people can be affected by the efforts of so few. Last month, Estonia, one of the European Union's most promising emerging economies, got its first big taste of this, as protesters organized a massive attack, flooding government, newspapers and banking Web sites with data, effectively shutting many down. The cyberattack came in retaliation for the Estonian government's decision to relocate a Russian World War II-era statue. Estonia is a former member of the Soviet Union. The Times noted that "for people here, the Internet is almost as vital ...
  • Google Data Practices Said To Violate EU Law
    Google may be in legal trouble again. The search giant may be violating European Union law by storing information on its customers' queries for as long as two years. After a stretch of high-profile acquisitions, all the big Web firms, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL, have come under scrutiny for the way they capture user-surfing information. EU regulators last week suggested such practices might violate civil liberties. "Google may have initiated personalization efforts which are more advanced in some ways, but it's an industrywide issue," said Greg Sterling, an analyst at Sterling Market Intelligence in Oakland, California. ...
  • Business Week To Launch VC Video Competition
    The well-respected business magazine is mulling the idea of a "business YouTube" that would allow would-be moguls to pitch ideas to the paper's readers, who would vote on a winner to receive $500,000 in venture-capital funding. Speaking at a conference in Miami, John Byrne, the acting editor-in-chief for Businessweek.com, said the company was looking to purchase a new technology platform to help create the interactive competition. Byrne said the idea behind the move is to both widen the site's audience and boost repeat visits among existing users. Like a reality show, the idea's success hinges on quality production and ...
  • Facebook Opens Up to Software Developers
    Facebook on Thursday said it was opening its social-networking platform to allow software developers to create programs within the social network and to allow independents to use Facebook's template as a launch pad for their own social media services. To be sure, it's a bold, open source-like move to Facebook, already the sixth most-visited site on the Web with 24 million monthly unique users. Last year, Facebook opened up its site to users of all ages. At the product's unveiling, "a carefully orchestrated event with more the air of a college job recruiting fair than a trade show," per ...
  • More Innovation From Google News
    Newspaper companies love to hate Google's article aggregation and search site Google News. On the one hand, the free service drives traffic to their sites. On the other, Google News displays articles from just about every news outlet, so a newspaper company's work can easily get lost in the glut of information. Also, they have no control over how the news service ranks stories. Two years ago, the French news agency Agence France Presse and later, Belgium's Copiepresse, sued Google for copyright infringement for indexing their content without permission. Google contended--and lost in EU court--that Google News is ...
  • CNN To Make Video Service Free
    CNN is ditching the idea of charging a subscription fee for its CNN Pipeline video news service, which will now be absorbed into a newly designed Internet package. Launched in late 2005, the $25-per-year service (which was later $2.95 per month and $.99 per day), provides four streams of video with footage of breaking news. The international news service doesn't say how many subscribers Pipeline has, but on its best day--the fifth anniversary of 9/11--Pipeline pulled in 1.2 million viewers, a day when Pipeline was free. With Pipeline, CNN planned to reach American office workers who check news periodically ...
  • MTV Adds More Virtual Networks
    As promised, MTV Networks is developing several more virtual worlds as part of its bold strategy to capitalize on its more popular brands. Speaking at the Goldman Sachs Internet Conference in Las Vegas, MTVN Global Digital Media President Mika Salmi pointed to the company's more than 230 microsites containing TV, games and other forms of content, saying it would add more virtual worlds for its shows and different music genres. He added that MTV next plans to integrate users' avatars into TV shows. MTVN already has five virtual worlds, including one tied to the hit show "Laguna Beach" and another ...
  • What's the ROI For Second Life?
    Business Week reported a few days ago that big companies like News Corp. and Sony Corp. are taking a close look at virtual worlds -- primarily those catering to young kids and tweens, like Club Penguin and Webkinz.com. In the adult world, Second Life has been getting all the attention for its innovative, thriving virtual economy -- and its showcasing the experimental advertising efforts of global brands. For many companies, from ad agencies to news outlets to the NBA, there's a certain cachet about having a presence in Second Life. But, GigaOm asks, what's the ROI on these marketing expenses? ...
  • Ask Isn't Sweating The Competition
    If you're in the search engine business and you don't work for Google, you probably think and talk about Google all the time anyway. If you're Yahoo, you wonder why Google still does a much better job monetizing its search traffic. If you're Microsoft, you're wondering how many more millions to invest to gain a few percentage points of market share. And if you're Ask.com, you might ask, is there a niche or something here for us? Forbes talks to Ask.com CEO Jim Lanzone about his company's place in search -- read: What's it like fighting a losing ...
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