• Wall Street Journal Adds Facebook App
    The Wall Street Journal is adding a feature to its Web site that allows users to see which of its stories are popular among their Facebook friends. The application, called "SeenThis?," is powered by a company called Loomia, which already provides the "People who read this...also read these stories" feature on WSJ.com. "SeenThis?" will be opt-in, and can be added to a users Wall Street Journal or Facebook homepage. It does not collect personally identifiable information about which people read which articles; it aggregates information on which articles are most read by a users group of friends. ...
  • eBay Incumbent Implements Big Changes
    Incumbent CEO John Donahoe on Tuesday introduced pricing changes that will benefit eBay's top sellers by rewarding them with sales incentives and a priority ranking when buyers search for auctioned items. The biggest change is a reduction in seller fees as the value of sales goes up. Successful sellers will also feature more prominently in eBay's search results. "Put simply, we will make more of our money when sellers are successful," Donahoe said in a statement. Yes, but the change also encourages merchants to sell more expensive items. Other key changes included lowering fees for auction listings and ...
  • Facebook Apps Bear Little Fruit
    How much money does Facebook Apps make? Not too much, judging by results from VideoEgg, which serves ads to a network of Facebook apps. Earlier in the week, the company trumpeted about its so-called eggnetwork pulling in $1.5 million in ad revenue over the last five months, but that isn't too impressive, especially when you consider that VideoEgg's client list includes some of Facebook's most popular apps like Scrabulous, Flixster and Vampires. In all, the application network contains more than 150 Faceook-specific programs. If we had some impression data, then we could come up with a rough ...
  • Silicon Valley VCs Fear Recession
  • Digg Triples Registered Users
  • Analysts: Google Looks Recession-Proof
  • Diller, Liberty Media Fight For IAC Control
    Liberty Media Corp. Chairman John Malone plans to oust Barry Diller, head of the Web conglomerate IAC/InterActiveCorp. In response to Diller's announcement that IAC would break into five public entities, Malone has nominated a series of replacements for the IAC board. He also took steps to undermine a proxy agreement that allows Diller to vote Liberty's majority voting stake in the company. The proxy is seen as "essentially unbreakable" but yesterday Malone launched a legal maneuver to try to get around it. The war between the media moguls was triggered last week when Diller announced that ...
  • QTrax's Humiliating Launch
    It was a pretty humiliating launch day for QTrax, the ad-supported music download site that was highly touted for the having four major record labels as partners. QTrax didn't have the backing of a single one of the Big Four, as EMI, Warner, Sony BMG and Universal all confirmed. Warner and Universal are currently talking to the new online music provider. QTrax execs insisted that they would not have launched the service without Big Music's backing, although they admitted that the "ink hadn't dried" on some of deals. The company had spent an estimated $1 million at a conference ...
  • Super Bowl Adds Web Extravaganza
    Super Bowl advertising has always been a television event in and of itself, but now, the Web is playing an increasingly bigger role in the advertising blitz. This year, Super Bowl marketers are dabbling in everything from Web video to profiles on social-networks as part of their Super Bowl campaign. Companies that have spent $2.7 million on 30-second TV ads are expanding their investments through online promotions and tie-ins. Meanwhile, advertisers without Super Bowl spots are splashing cash on big, cheap Super Bowl audiences online. Some examples: this weekend, Pepsi North America is boosting its Super ...
  • Google At The Ad Club
    CNET's Caroline McCarthy lent an ear to the latest New York Advertising Club meeting at Google's offices in Chelsea, during which company execs discussed the Web giant's broad and expanding advertising strategy. Google is venturing into print, TV and radio with the aim of bringing the measurability of the Internet to the offline world. Monday's discussion focused mostly on search king's traditional media initiatives, although the Google team also touched on emerging platforms like Web video, mobile advertising and social media. Google's immediate video strategy is less about revolutionizing the industry with new ad forms and more ...
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