• Revenue Science Secures $25 Million In Funding
    Revenue Science, a behavioral targeting firm, has received $25 million in venture capital funding. Its total backing is now $70 million in the last five years. The company plans to put the money into its expanding behavioral targeting network. A behavioral targeting network allows advertisers to buy behavioral segments across several Web sites. Adweek uses the example of a user who has demonstrated that he is in-market for a car being shown auto-related ads while browsing ESPN.com. Revenue Science's publishers include ESPN.com, Edmunds.com and The Wall Street Journal.
  • Search Marketers: Google-AOL Deal Puts MSN In The Cold
    Search marketers, in particular, will feel the most immediate impact of the fortified alliance between Google, Inc. and America Online. The potential to add graphical ads to paid listings and to buy them directly from AOL adds a new dimension, which search marketers discuss with ClickZ. One executive says the expanded deal solidifies Google and Yahoo's ranking as the two dominant players in search, which he and others say is a shame because the market could have used more competition. It's also a big setback for Microsoft's ambition to become a major player in Internet advertising, especially as the company ...
  • Internet Retailing During Holidays Overextends Delivery Companies
    An interesting article from The San Francisco Chronicle points out that the dramatic surge in online retailing (especially during the holidays) extends the resources of delivery companies like UPS to their absolute limits. One UPS driver reports making more than 300 deliveries on Tuesday the 20th, the single busiest day of the year for delivery companies handling a workload that's nearly 50 percent more than last year's, according to the article. And the business of moving packages is strenuous work, too. Delivery companies like UPS and FedEx report they had already surpassed their holiday goals before Dec. 20 due to ...
  • Despite Litigation Gloom, Strong Results Boost Shares for RIM
    Some much-needed good news saw shares surge Thursday for BlackBerry maker Research In Motion. The litigation-worn Canadian company posted an unexpected 33 percent rise in third quarter profit, causing shares to jump 11 percent yesterday. The impressive earnings quelled fears that its ongoing and exhausting patent dispute with NTP Inc. had caused a mass customer defection. In 2002, NTP won a patent infringement verdict against RIM; now it seeks an injunction to shut down RIM's popular BlackBerry service in the U.S. if RIM refuses to settle. A settlement at this point looks highly unlikely. Despite strong earnings, investors' optimism was ...
  • Jews for Jesus Group Sues Google
    Google is being sued again (what else is new?) This time, Christian evangelical group Jews for Jesus is forcing the media giant to hand over control of a Web log hosted on the company's Blogspot service that it says infringes on the Jews for Jesus trademark. The group, which is also seeking punitive damages, alleges that Google illegally allowed the use of its name without consent. A blogger named "Whistle Blower" opened the site, which has just three entries, in January 2005. Surely, this is not the only case of bloggers naming their blog after someone else's trademark. In any ...
  • Tis the Season to be Fraud-ed
    Fraudsters love the holidays because the volume of online credit card transactions is higher than at any other time of the year. The holidays are a great reason to scam people into giving up their information. In fact, Internet security executives tell users they can expect twice as many phishing attacks this holiday season. Phishers gain access to sensitive information by sending out spam or by propping up fraudulent Web sites requesting credit card, home address or social security numbers. Last December there were 8,829 phishing scams; this October there were 15,820, according to e-mail management firm MailFrontier. Apparently security ...
  • E-mail ROI: 78 Percent Buy After Seeing Ads, Promotions
    New consumer data shows that e-mail marketing works--quite well, in fact. Seventy-eight percent of respondents to DoubleClick's sixth annual consumer survey, "E-mail Solutions," said they've made a purchase as a result of receiving an e-mail, 59 percent said they've redeemed an e-mail coupon in a store, and nearly one-third said they've clicked on an e-mail and made an immediate purchase. Users are now comfortable with e-mail; the report says they understand and accept the fact that marketers collect and use data to send them relevant e-mails. However, they are very worried about viruses, spyware and phishing scams: 75 percent fear ...
  • Report Pegs Online Ad Growth at 25 Percent Worldwide Through 2010
    Wall Street firm JMP Securities says advertising on the Internet will grow at a compounded rate of 25 percent worldwide for the next five years. The firm predicts that next year the global online ad market will reach $26.4 billion, and then $33.2 billion in 2007. Meanwhile, Forrester Research says that consumers with Internet access are now spending more than 30 percent of their time online, which caused JMP to raise its growth forecasts, according to the Hollywood Reporter. Online ad market growth predictions have been all over the map this year--Piper Jaffray recently predicted a $55 billion U.S. market ...
  • New Disney Boutique Lets Consumers Make Their Own Products
    The Walt Disney Company is now letting its customers design their own clothing complete with Disney images. The media company has forged a partnership with Zazzle.com, an online customization service that lets users sell their own art for use on personalized T-shirts, greeting cards and postage stamps. Consumers can select a Disney character, name or phrase from 4,000 images at the online boutique at disneyshopping.com and disneylinkshop.com.
  • Analysts Blame Microsoft For Poor Q4 Game Sales
    Following an 18 percent sales slide in November, big-name video game publishers like Electronic Arts and Activision are downsizing their fourth quarter earnings projections. Apparently, nobody's buying video games this Christmas--traditionally the most successful spell for the industry. So what's wrong this year? Analysts blame Microsoft for doing a thorough job marketing its new Xbox 360 console and then failing to produce enough units to come even close to meeting sales projections. That Microsoft has sold only 320,000 consoles thus far is its own fault--it wanted to sell 1.5 million units by the end of the year. Now it will ...
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