• MARKETING: SPORTS
    As Sports Consumption Changes, So Must The Measurement Of Sponsorships
    In LeBron James' career full of highlights, one play stands above all others: The Block. The basketball star's full-court chase-down and rejection of Golden State's Andre Iguodala in game seven of the 2016 NBA Finals helped the Cavaliers win their first-ever title, ending Cleveland's 52-year championship drought. The play has its own Wikipedia page. Even Iguodala recently tipped his cap to LeBron, calling it a "great play" and saying he hears about it all day on social media.
  • MARKETING: SPORTS
    Reaching Consumers At Sports Festivals Is All The Rage
    Over the next six weeks, some of the biggest events in sports will take place: The NHL All-Star Game (Jan. 29), Super Bowl LI (Feb. 5), the NBA All-Star Game (Feb. 19), the Daytona 500 (Feb. 26) and NCAA men's and women's basketball March Madness.
  • MARKETING: SPORTS
    Breathing Life Into The Stale Sports Activation Scene
    Have you experienced a fan festival or any number of sports activations taking place in and around the stadium? Chances are, if you've seen one, you've seen them all.
  • MARKETING: SPORTS
    Beware Of Echo Chambers
    In today's world, we are inundated with incessant chatter, be it social media rants by friends, celebrities or athletes on Instagram or Twitter, or even special interest media outlets. By choosing to follow specific individuals, brands, or news stations, we are apt to surround ourselves with others whose opinions are similar to ours. These "echo chambers" can reverberate and reaffirm what we believe, and it's easy to lose oneself in the perception that these opinions are surrogate for those of a larger and more representative population.
  • MARKETING: SPORTS
    Everything Is Content, Content Is Everything
    This week, 21 years ago, on Microsoft's website Bill Gates wrote an essay - we didn't call them blogs back then, did we? - with a headline destined for countless textbooks to come. Titled simply "Content Is King," Bill's essay asserted that, just like with broadcast and radio technology before it, money that would be made on the Internet would not be in the manufacturing of hardware - but, instead, in the creation of content.