• ENGAGE:TEENS
    A New Approach To The App Marketing Mix
    Millennials - and younger ones in particular - are voracious content consumers across all media channels - television, online, games, apps and mobile. These teens are an attractive demographic that marketers are eager to capture through traditional and emerging channels alike. The greatest opportunity comes by creating and leveraging connections between the channels teens rely on, and nowhere is that truer than the screens that matter most: television and mobile devices. Unfortunately, few have figured out how to drive measurable cross-screen engagement. That needs to change and there are early signs that change is beginning.
  • ENGAGE:TEENS
    Streaming Radio Killed The Music Video Star
    While there might have been a time when music television had taken a higher place than radio in teens' esteem, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction with the growth of streaming radio services. Unlike traditional radio stations (which also offer streaming), the services below offer teens customizable, on-demand listening options that they can take anywhere. There's a battle brewing among service providers to win over young listeners with free, ad-supported options, and it's a competition that marketers should watch with interest.
  • ENGAGE:TEENS
    Tapping Into The Excitement Of Youth To Make STEM Come Alive
    It seems that everywhere people are talking or writing about STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), and the need for qualified workers to fill a growing number of jobs now and in the near future. Yet, surprisingly, 90% of high school students say that are not interested in pursuing a career or college major involving STEM, according to a survey of a million-plus students who take the ACT exam. That is concerning since, in just five short years, it is estimated that there will be 2.4 million STEM job openings.
  • ENGAGE:TEENS
    Fragmented Social Media Market Offers Challenges And Opportunities
    In the relatively short history of the social web, there has always been one major network that was the currency among teens. In the mid-2000s, it was MySpace. In the later part of that same decade, Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook took over.