• Trump-Pence Campaign Asks For Funds To Combat Democrats' 'Media Machine'
    There is an interesting direct-to-consumer media funding model emerging from the Trump Pence campaign this week. In an email signed by Vice President Mike Pence, the campaign is promoting contributions by implying it will be used to offset the Democrats "media machine."
  • The Next New Face Of The Democratic Party
    If there's anything we've learned from 2016, it's that low voter turnout can produce some surprising electoral results. That proved to be the case Tuesday in a New York primary election for a 2016 Congressional seat that was closely watched. The incumbent, Joseph Crowley, considered a likely successor to become Speaker of the House, should was deemed a shoe-in. Guess what happened?
  • When Counterprogramming Becomes Counterproductive
    Webster defines womp as "an abrupt increase in the illumination of a television screen resulting from an abrupt increase in signal strength," which is exactly what Corey Lewandowski's snide remark on Fox News appears to have done this week.
  • It's The Audience Data, Stupid
    That's what political media-buying and advertising operatives at ad agencies involved in the 2016 midterm elections campaigns said when digital advertising and media-buying technology firm Centro surveyed them about their views on political media campaigns recently. "When we asked what would be the most promising developments for digital campaigns this year, more than half of respondents selected 'audience data that is higher quality and more readily available'," says Grace Briscoe, vice president-candidates and causes at Centro and author of a new report, "The Digital Media Trends Political Marketers are Watching in 2018."
  • Has The Trump Bump Turned Into A News Slump?
    After 500-plus days of a news consumption high, it looks like Americans are just plain worn out. Especially the Republican kind. According to findings of a nationwide study conducted by the Pew Research Center, more than two-thirds (68%) of U.S. adults report they are "worn out" by the amount of news coverage. Interestingly, the study finds Republicans report being dramatically more worn out (77%) vs. Democrats (61%).