• ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Boomers And The Importance Of Modern-day Nostalgia
    As marketers, we have to stop thinking of the estimated 75 million+ baby boomers as a generation that is technologically adverse, especially as it relates to how we speak to them through advertising.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Boomers' Second Acts Can Pay Off For Marketers
    There are many reasons three-quarters of Baby Boomers are planning to work past traditional retirement age. Some are trying to build up a post-recession retirement fund or keep up with a hefty mortgage payment. Others have adult children and/or parents to support. Still others just enjoy their current work or want to start an "encore" career. Whatever the reasons for working, the Boomer generation's desire to stay in the job market can bring opportunities to marketers in a range of industries. Here are a few areas to watch.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Boomers Are Listening
    Remember when radio was our only audio source for news, sports and, of course, music discovery? Eighty million or more American boomers listened to radio. Our favorite DJs. The latest hits. The big ball game. And then it became portable! The transistor radio changed our lives. For the first time, we could listen to the radio at the beach or in the park. Well, things have certainly changed. In the last 10 years, audio consumption has fragmented.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Target Millennials Or Boomers? Why Not Both?
    At the Cannes Lions festival later this month I'll be joining Kirsty Fuller, co-founder and co-CEO of the global insight and brand consultancy Flamingo Group. Kirsty and Flamingo have been studying the aging marketplace for many years. Their 2009 report, "Talkin' 'Bout My Generation," delivered new insights on the rapidly changing marketplace of 50+ consumers, and the value in reaching them.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    5 Ways All Brands Can Impact The Growing Boomer Caregiver Market
    It is estimated that over 40 million Americans currently provide care for an aging parent, spouse, aunt, uncle, friend or other loved one so that they can live independently at home. A majority of these caregivers are Boomers, and they devote, on average, 20 hours per week to providing unpaid care. Caregivers tend to be women, three-quarters of whom also have a job. The considerable time they commit to a loved one's care means less time to spend on personal priorities and care, and this sacrifice often takes a considerable financial, physical and emotional toll.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Boomers Are Not a Generation New To Technology
    Boomers adopt tablets, wearable devices and other technologies just as energetically as younger users, according to participants at last year's Booming Tech forum, which focused on the use of technology in that generation.