• ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Hey, Grocers And Household Brands, Don't Forget the 55+ Audience This Holiday Season
    The holiday season, the most pivotal time of the year for marketers, is just around the corner. With consumer spending booming during this period (NRF reported $626.1 billion spent last year), understanding the mindset of consumers is vital.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    When Aging In Place Puts Baby Boomers In A Tough Place
    The number of older people who live alone at home continues to climb: 13 million in 2015. And for women over 75, the numbers are even more shocking. 45% live alone, according to a recent "Philadelphia Inquirer" article.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Building Brand Trust In An Age Of Mistrust
    Older consumers are disproportionately skeptical of marketing, believing that marketers either don't understand them or ignore them altogether. A recent study indicated that fewer than one in four people age 50+ believe marketers do a good job of representing people like them in advertising. How can marketers who want to meaningfully impact America's most powerful spending block-who are responsible for more than half of all consumer spending-address Boomers' skepticism?
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Tiny Living For The Not-so-small Life
    Tiny homes are emerging as a trend in the 50+ consumer marketplace. According to research by The Tiny Life, 38% of tiny-home owners are over the age of 50. The movement has shifted from pioneers living off the grid to a mainstream desire to downsize our lives. Keep in mind, the average home in the U.S. is around 2,600 square feet. Tiny homes vary from 100-400 square feet. The movement is being fed by FYI's "Tiny House Nation" and HGTV's "Tiny House Hunters," the growing number of web sites, and how-to books.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Boomerang Kids Forever: The New Normal
    While unemployment seemed to drive millions of young adults back to their childhood homes, the fact of having gotten jobs did not result in their moving out. Recent research suggests that the adult Millennial child and his or her Boomer parents are now a permanent part of our landscape. Marketers need to face this new reality: their "coveted 18-34 year old" is probably eating food, sitting on furniture, and streaming content via wifi that has all been purchased by his or her midlife parent.
  • ENGAGE:BOOMERS
    Want To Connect With Baby Boomers? Get Your Messages Creatively Right
    Contrary to the perception that aging brings a calcification of shopping habits, many over-50 consumers diversify their spending habits as they grow older. That diversification, plus the narrower tactics of contemporary marketing practices, makes them much tougher to reach through advertising. As older consumers and the Baby Boomer cluster move from the crowd-think of their youth to personal uniqueness, marketing messaging should also move to meet them on their new turf.