• Bowl Sponsors Are Everywhere
    Super Bowl advertisers are spreading their commercial messages to as many venues as possible this year. Not only will viewers see expensive, high-tech ads on the game itself, but the commercial will also begin showing up on the Internet, on iPods, and even on cell phones. It only makes sense that marketers would try to get as big a bang for their buck as possible, especially considering they are paying an average $2.5 million for a 30-second spot. "It's a better way to amortize the cost of Super Bowl ads," says Seth Palansky, NFL spokesman. "The goal is more places ...
  • Ford Turns To Consultant for Marketing Help
    Ford Motor, facing huge financial losses and in the throes of a restructuring, has turned to a management consultant for help with its marketing plans. The giant automaker hired Accenture to review its U.S. media measurement and optimization program, in a move that could lead to major changes in the company's ad spending and media mix. The carmaker is said to be specifically studying major model launches for Ford, Lincoln and Mercury brands. Ford wants to know the optimum national and regional dealer group media weight and mix for a vehicle based on its targeted annual sales' volume. Such a ...
  • M&Ms Jumps On Oscar Bandwagon
    M&Ms candy is getting into the hoopla surrounding the Academy Awards by placing M&Ms with custom-printed messages of congratulations in gift bags presented to actors and actresses nominated for Oscars. In addition, the candy maker will offer M&M's Red Carpet Blend, an assortment of red and gold M&M's reminiscent of the red carpet glitz, for a limited time on mms.com. The Web site also will feature tips from celebrity entertainment expert David Tutera on how to throw an Oscar party at home, and an M&M's Golden Flix Mix recipe by Denise Vivaldo, author of Do it for Less! Parties, ...
  • Handhelds Pose New Challenges for Marketers
    The advent of video iPods has posed a vexing problem for marketers. The device now lets users watch TV programming whenever they want to, but the paid content available from Apple's iTunes service comes ad-free. As such, marketers are trying to figure out how to get their commercial messages on the tiny screen. "It's a lot of trial and error," says Liz Vanzura, global marketing director for General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac division. Marketers are eager to experiment, but many are struggling to figure out what ad content is appropriate for the iPod. Some companies, such as Nintendo Co., have taken ...
  • The Importance And Opportunity Of Global Marketing
    This year many marketers are exploring the possibilities and potential posed by global marketing. As they evaluate the benefits and pitfalls of taking their brands to foreign markets, they must examine their motives and ask themselves why they need to globalize their message and reach. This article offers five points to remember and explore when embarking on a global marketing endeavor. They include the need to prepare for growth beyond North Atlantic borders, the importance of reinforcing your brand in international markets and the wisdom of balancing your business portfolio among diverse markets.
  • Local TV a Gold Mine for Product Placement
    Morning television shows produced by local TV station have become a gold mine for marketers seeking a place to promote their brands via product placement and program integration. Opportunities still abound on the local shows, unlike at prime-time and national levels, where marketers are finding it difficult to secure available space due to demand. Those other platforms are also more expensive than local TV, where producers are hungry for free content. Appearances on local shows often come in the form of four-minute lifestyle segments dedicated to one brand that feature a brand's spokesperson chatting with the show's host and delivering ...
  • New Device Plays Video Ads As Shoppers Pass By
    The newest trend in point-of-purchase marketing is a device that plays a 10-second video ad on a small screen placed on a store shelf that starts automatically when a shopper walks by. Called ShelfAds, the products are being produced by POP Broadcasting and cost $300 to make. They are battery operated, attachable to store shelves and operated by a remote server the size of a cigar box. So far, marketers including Coca-Cola Co., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Kraft Food's Maxwell House, Bush Bros. and Tyson Foods have signed on to test the device for free. The goal of the new system is ...
  • New Partners Help Music Industry On Marketing Costs
    The music industry has had more than its share of trouble adapting to the digital age, but at least one aspect of the business is benefiting from fan interest in online music services: marketing. Before the digital age, music labels had to pay the full freight for marketing a new album. But that is changing now as much of those costs are being shared with new partners willing to pay for exclusive content. For example, when Madonna launched a multimillion-dollar marketing campaign for her album "Confessions On A Dancefloor," the single "Hung Up" was released as a ringtone ahead of ...
  • New Print Effort Backs Mercedes Redesign
    Mercedes-Benz is embarking on a new ad campaign design to improve the venerable German automaker's image following a series of problems that tarnished its vaunted reputation for excellence. Mercedes dropped to No. 4 in the luxury car market in recent years after being ranked No. 2 in consumer quality surveys. The decline was attributed to defects in some models, including a glitch in a high-tech brake system that forced a vehicle recall in 2004. But a redesigned version of the company's flagship S-class sedan is about to hit showrooms, backed by 60 to 90 print ads that will run throughout ...
  • Superbowl.com Draws Sponsors, Too
    Advertisers who want to connect their brands to the Super Bowl have much to choose from. They can advertise in programming before the game, during the game, and after the game. But the big game also has an official online presence that advertisers want to be a part of. On Superbowl.com, users will find ads not only from sponsors who also advertise on the game itself--like Pepsi, Cadillac, and Sprint--but also from marketers without regular TV spots. "I think there's a little bit of both. For the most part you're going to see a lot of the same advertisers spending ...
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